Trevor J Lowes Photography: Blog http://www.tjlowesphotography.com/blog en-us Copyright (C) Trevor J Lowes Photography uk (Trevor J Lowes Photography) Fri, 25 Sep 2015 15:34:00 GMT Fri, 25 Sep 2015 15:34:00 GMT Photographing the Palace of Westminster from South Bank http://www.tjlowesphotography.com/blog/2015/9/photographing-the-palace-of-westminster-from-south-bank Palace of WestminsterPalace of Westminster

I set out one evening to photograph the Palace of Westminster. I arrived on the South Bank at about ten past eight. Big Ben was facing me across the River Thames and Westminster Bridge was to my right.

It was easy to choose a position to shoot from as I was the only one there!

After setting up my camera and tripod I took a few test shots using a Nikon 17-35mm lens to help me decide what I wanted out of the image, I finally decided to include the first lamp post on the bridge and as much of the Palace of Westminster as possible to my left.

The 17-35mm lens I was using is a little soft in the corners when wide open so I set the focal length to around 20mm,

By this time the sky was starting to get a little darker and the lights on the bridge reflecting in the water looked very impressive. By nine o clock the sky was at its best. It was a deep blue but not to dark and a stunning slim white cloud followed the line of the bridge.

At this point I felt that things were not going to get any better so I now concentrated on my exposure times and aperture settings. After about a dozen shots my wife yells: "hurry up I'm freezing and hungry." As I turned to her there was laughter from about ten other photographers - all of them also there to capture the picturesque sky.

 

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(Trevor J Lowes Photography) Landscape Palace of Westminster Photography http://www.tjlowesphotography.com/blog/2015/9/photographing-the-palace-of-westminster-from-south-bank Fri, 25 Sep 2015 15:30:01 GMT
The Blue Pool, Dorset http://www.tjlowesphotography.com/blog/2015/8/the-blue-pool-dorset

 

In the early 17th Century the pool was a clay pit. Purbeck Ball Clay was dug up from the pit to make clay pipes and pottery.

The blue pool owes its name to the colour generated by minute particles of clay that are suspended in the water.

The particles diffract the reflecting light and produce light yielding colours from grey to green to turquoise.

The metallic blue found in some photographs is a reflection from the sky.  

 

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(Trevor J Lowes Photography) Dorset The Blue Pool Water http://www.tjlowesphotography.com/blog/2015/8/the-blue-pool-dorset Wed, 19 Aug 2015 18:07:48 GMT